Chavoin House Mass at Marist College

Empowerment through Presence was the theme of the recent Chavoin House Mass at Marist College Mt Albert, New Zealand. Sr Seini Fatai presented the following reflection during the Mass:

Empowerment through Presence
Jeanne-Marie Chavoin, Foundress of the Marist Sisters

Life is full of mysteries and we often wonder how we may ever solve some of them. I am sure that you young women of our Marist School often wonder what your future might be. Whether you are going to fulfil your dream to become a doctor or marry a handsome and successful guy or whether you are going to be a caring mother of some beautiful children, or better still perhaps a Marist Sister.

Some of the mysteries of my life began to unfold when I was as young person like you. Growing up, I really looked up to my dad because he had a way of empowering me to be the best person I could be. My dad was my greatest role model for he helped me unfold some of the mysteries in my life.

As a young person Jeanne-Marie Chavoin too was influenced by her father as she was discerning God’s will in her life. But life was a big mystery for her too, as she did not know what God wanted her to do but she waited, listened in prayers and answered His call and that is how we have our congregation of the Marist Sisters.

Chavoin’s life showed a great sense of balance. What do I mean by that? That means that she lived her life knowing that prayer and service must go hand in hand. She believed that God’s Loving Presence in the Eucharist gave meaning and spiritual power to her work. Chavoin believed that her prayer life provided her with purpose and meaning for doing her work well.

Father Colin, the founder of the Marist Family, affirms this, saying “In all the three branches of the Society (Marist Fathers, Marist Brothers and the Marist Sisters), Chavoin is the person with the greatest spirit of prayer. I believe that Fr Colin would have agreed with me that Jeanne-Marie Chavoin is a woman of balance and one who empowered people with whom she came in contact.

In our Gospel today, we see that Mary, the mother of Jesus empowered people through her attentive and loving presence at the Wedding feast in a place called Cana in Galilee. Mary noticed that the wine for the party was nearly finished so to avoid embarrassment for the host family she took the matter to Jesus. Because Mary was attentive to her Son, a positive result came about. People had lots of wine to drink. Jeanne-Marie Chavoin did learn from Mary how to be a woman of empowerment through her presence in every situation.

One of the things that we could all learn from Jeanne-Marie Chavoin is to be people (men and women) of prayer an action here in our Marist College community. If she were here today, she would remind us all, that God is the source of strength and power, and our work and learning here in this school can only find meaning in God through prayer. So, how often do you spend time talking and listening to God? As we leave today from this Eucharistic celebration, let us remind ourselves that God is always wanting to have a chat with us. Are we ready?

 

Drinking from the Wellspring of Life

A group of twenty five Marist Sisters from around the world have gathered in Auckland, New Zealand, for a time of renewal the theme of which is Drinking from the Wellsprings of Life. During the first week participants have appreciated being together and the contemplative atmosphere that has permeated each days activities. There has been time for input, for reflecting, for sharing and for experiencing the beauty of the world around us. The Fijian Community in Auckland paid a visit to the group one evening which was a rich cultural experience for all.

A Foundress is Born

Jeanne-Marie Chavoin, Foundress of the Marist Sisters, was born on 29th August 1786 in the French village of Coutouvre. Her father, Théodore Chavoin, was a tailor, while her mother, Jeanne Verchère,  worked as a servant.

Jeanne-Marie Chavoin spent 30 years of her life in the village of Coutouvre. From the front door of her family home she could see the village square and the church just beyond. Jeanne-Marie’s life in Coutouvre was people-oriented. From the Chavoin home her father ran a tailor’s shop. Customers came daily, exchanging the latest news, sharing the joys and concerns of the village.

God of creation,
we praise and thank you for the birth of Jeanne-Marie Chavoin,
our foundress, Mother St Joseph.
We thank you for her parents, Théodore and Jeanne,
for their love, their courage, their acceptance of responsibility and all they taught Jeanne-Marie.
May our foundress intercede for us today,
that we may present a Marian face in our world –
a face of compassion, understanding and love,
a face which accepts people as they are,
yet encourages them to grow in goodness.
With them, may we be brought forth to the life of grace.
We pray this in the name of Jesus your Son.

Marist College Celebrates Feast of the Assumption

Marist College, Mt Albert Auckland celebrated the Feast of the Assumption on the 15th of August. Bishop of Auckland, Bishop Patrick Dunn was the main celebrant in the School Feast Day Mass. Father Kevin Murphy sm, the school chaplain and the parish priest Fr Philip Lakra ofmcap concelebrated this beautiful Eucharist. The focus of the Mass was “Empowerment” for it is the core value of Marist College for the year.

In the Mass, the school community was reminded that we look to Mary as the role model, a courageous and faith-filled woman, who in her own simplicity pointed the way to Jesus. Mary is the figure of empowerment for us as she showed us what it means to empower others. She empowered Elizabeth when she stayed with her for about three months. At the Wedding Feast of Cana she empowered her son Jesus to change the water into wine. Mary taught us to be other centred and enrich the lives of those around us through our words and deeds.

The highlight of the Mass was the conferring of the Sacraments of Initiation for 17 young women. Before the final blessing, Bishop Pat blessed the Chavoin Honour Board which shows the list of students who have won the “Chavoin Award” since 1968. Our Sister Lorraine Campbell was the recipient in 1969 and she was one of the ex-students who unveiled this special board.

Bennetswood Celebration

Srs Cath Lacey and Kate McPhee recently represented the Marist Sisters in Australia at the 60th anniversary of St Scholastica’s Primary School, Bennetswood on 11 th August. The Archbishop of Melbourne (Archbishop Peter Commensoli) was the main celebrant of the Mass which was followed by lunch and an inspection of the school which has been refurbished in the last few years. There was a great crowd of parishioners, both past and present, and a number of ex-students who were interested to hear about the Sisters who had been at St Scholastica’s over the years. Cath and Kate were presented with a commemorative candle and a plaque which acknowledges the work of the Marist Sisters at the school over 20 years.

Celebrating Marist Jubilees

What a wonderful celebration it was when Marist Sisters in Fiji, family and friends gathered to celebrate the Golden and Diamond Jubilees of Marist Profession for Srs Veronica Lum and Torika Wong. Archbishop Peter Chong Loy was Chief celebrant at the Mass and he reminisced on his school days at St John’s College when Vero was his Chemistry teacher. Many of Vero’s classmates of Loreto were present and lots of Sr Torika’s relatives. The family sang a beautiful hymn after communion. About two hundred guests packed the parish hall. The food was delicious. We praise and thank God for our two sisters and their dedicated service to the church in Fiji and the Philippines.

 

Sr Isabelle Harding sm

Sr Isabelle Harding sm sm was called to eternal life on Sunday 11th August 2019.

Eternal rest grant to her, O Lord.
May perpetual light shine upon her.
May she rest in peace.
Amen.

We extend our prayerful sympathy to the Marist Sisters in Aotearoa-New Zealand and to Sr Isabelle’s family. the following eulogy was delivered at her funeral held at St Mary’s Parish, Mt Albert on 14th August 2019.

With the death of Barbara Jean Harding, Sister Isabelle, it is the end of an era, several in fact.
Firstly for her family as Isabelle is the last of the thirteen children of Isabella and George Harding to die, and so the last of her generation of the family. She has been the Matriarch for some years and the keeper of the family history all her life.
It is also the end of the era of the Marist Sisters having an important part to play in Waitaruke and especially at the school there, Hato Hohepa for 90 years. Sister Isabelle was the last Sister on the staff and was later for a number of  years the Chairperson of the Board of Trustees.
Again, Sister Isabelle was the last of the young Marist Sisters who in the 50’s and 60’s left Australia and New Zealand soon after their Profession to go to the Missions in Fiji. Earlier others had also gone to Tonga but had been evacuated during WW2. Isabelle went to Fiji in 1960 and taught at the Goldmines school in Vatukoula and also at schools in Lami, Solevu and Varoka, Ba,and Nadi, all on the main Island of Viti Levu, and later on the outer Islands of Ovalau and Yasawa.   Isabelle is the last of the valiant and wonderful women we all knew there, Josephine, Regina, Anita, Sabina, Miriam and many others. Of course there were also French and Irish Sisters and others like Alexius and Nolasco who were born in Fiji but were part of that generation also. Today all the Marist Sisters in Fiji are  born and bred in that country, are living in different parts of  Fiji serving the needs of their people in new ministries as well as in schools.
In 1982 Isabelle came back to New Zealand for good, and after a few years teaching at Mt Albert, Orakei and Putaruru, she went to the North where she remained for the next almost thirty years. She taught at Hato Hohepa until she was given the Diocesan Ministry of Religious Education Adviser, Northland.  She held this position for eight years, and if you were around in Kerikeri where she lived at that time, you would have seen her in her little car which held a TV monitor, stacks of religious videos, and piles of books and papers heading out the gate to go North South East and West to visit schools, parishes, families and individuals, to prepare them for the Sacraments and nourish their Faith.
In 2003 she was back in Waitaruke, involved in the school and Parish, and in particular facilitating and tutoring those who wished to follow the three year programme of ,’Walk By Faith’ and many men and women in the North have done all or part of that course with her.
In 2014, as the buildings in Waitaruke were needed for a new venture, and Sister Margarita her companion, was now in Kauri Rest Home in Kaeo, Isabelle moved with Sister Catherine to join Sister Kathleen in Kaikohe where she continued the Walk By Faith Programme right up to the Graduation of the last group of participants earlier this year.
Sister Isabelle had many loves in her life. First of course, was the Lord and his mother Mary. She loved prayer and to meditate on the Scripture Readings of the day, both in English and Maori. She loved all things Maori, art, culture, marae stays, and especially Te Reo which she studied at Massey University and Wananga Aotearoa for many years.She loved her family deeply and the Marist Sisters and wider Marist family. She loved Waitaruke and especially the school where she taught the children, another of her loves, gardening. They grew vegetables, harvested them and proudly took them home to their families. She had a particular love for Waimahana and our little bach there and to swim in the beautiful bay.
Sister Isabelle was a wonderful woman to whom God had given many gifts and talents. As an artist and a poet she loved to share with Brother Romuald FMS, in Kaikohe, himself an artist and poet. She published two books about the Hokianga and her family which included many photos, another hobby, and poems.    As she aged she began to lose her eyesight from Aged Macular Degeneration.  She took advantage of the experience of blindness of Brother Mark Chamberlain FMS to learn ways of coping with this disability. She was also attracted by his guide-dog for she loved all animals, horses, cows, dogs and especially one special cat named, Psycho, who was in Waitaruke and Kaikohe, and is now buried in a grove of trees just inside the gates of Waitaruke.
Sister Isabelle’s Fijian friends would say, “Moce, Sister, and loloma levu.
We say, ‘ Go in peace, Isabelle, enjoy eternal life with all you love.
Haere ra, Isabelle, Barbara Jean Harding, you good and faithful daughter of Mary.

 

Sr Loyola Grehan sm

Sr Loyola Grehan sm was called to eternal life on Wednesday 31st July 2019.

Eternal rest grant to her, O Lord.
May perpetual light shine upon her.
May she rest in peace.
Amen.

We extend our prayerful sympathy to the Marist Sisters in Fiji and to Sr Loyola’s family and friends.

Sr Margaret Purcell sm

Sr Margaret Purcell sm was called to eternal life on Monday 22nd July 2019.

Eternal rest grant to her, O Lord.
May perpetual light shine upon her.
May she rest in peace.
Amen.

We extend our prayerful sympathy to the Marist Sisters in Australia and to Sr Margaret’s family. The following words of remembrance were delivered by Sr Gail Reneker at her funeral on 27th July 2019.

It is a privilege for me to speak at this celebration of Margaret’s life and to honour the person she has been to each one of us.  It is a tribute to her that her family, her friends and her Sisters have gathered together this morning in thanksgiving for her and the blessing she has been in our lives.  Each of us brings personal memories of her.  This morning I would like to especially recall her life as a Marist Sister.

After finishing her school education at Marist Convent Woolwich Margaret trained and worked as a clerk/typist.  In 1947 she began her postulancy with the Marist Sisters at Merrylands, and received the habit in January 1948, when she was given the name Sister Vincent.  (It was in the 70’s that she went back to her baptismal name.) Margaret was professed on the 23rd January 1949 at Merrylands, and on the 13th May 1954 she made her perpetual vows at Woolwich.

After some initial training Margaret went to St Margaret Mary’s school Merrylands as a primary teacher.  The courage that was to become something of a hallmark in Margaret’s character was shown at the beginning of her ministry of teaching.  St Margaret Mary’s was a school where the enrolment of students burgeoned in the 1950’s with the post-war migration.  Margaret’s first class there was a kindergarten of 100 students.  It is reported that she went to sleep each night reciting their names so as to try to remember them all.  This courage was needed to be drawn on further when in 1957 she was appointed Superior of the community at Woolwich, a formidable role at her age in a sizeable community and in a role which also required her having a significant role in the school there.  An instance of the appreciation and regard in which the Sisters were held was the request in recent years received from a woman in Canada thanking the Sisters, and Sr Vincent in particular, on behalf of her mother for the education received there.  In 1960 Margaret went to Burwood Victoria as Superior of the community there and teacher at St Benedict’s Primary school. After Degree studies at Canberra University she was re-appointed to Burwood as Superior.  She also took up the role of Deputy Principal and Secondary teacher at Chavoin College.

In 1970 Margaret was elected Provincial of Oceania, a Province encompassing Sisters’ communities in Australia, New Zealand and Fiji.  A very specific task for Province leaders at that time, and so for Margaret, was the implementation of the direction set by Vatican 11 for the renewal of Religious life.  The changes inaugurated a somewhat difficult, challenging period for the Sisters.  The departure of a number of them was part of the upheaval which ensued.  Margaret’s wisdom, calm and inner strength was obvious as she guided the Province, seeking to respond to the signs of the times and the call to renewal while keeping the ship afloat.

These qualities together with her leadership and administrative abilities were recognised by the broader Congregation and she was elected as Superior General at the General Chapter of 1974.  She now had the task, in collaboration with her Administration, of negotiating on the global stage the paradigm shift we’d been called to.  Dealing with the various languages and different cultures with understanding and sensitivity added to the demands.  Given her reserved nature the role of Congregational leader was thus undertaken at significant personal cost.  There were also health issues to deal with and she felt the distance from her family and in particular her ailing mother.

Nevertheless Margaret gave herself wholeheartedly to the role and task confided to her.  It was during her administration that International renewals and pilgrimages for the Congregation’s members were begun.  These provided for participants to engage in a personal renewal program and to have the opportunity to visit Marist places of origin in France and drink of all that new historical research into our Marist spirituality was providing.  It was also during her two terms of office that a rewriting of our Constitutions was begun with a process which included visits from those charged with the task to engage all Sisters throughout the Congregation.

A particular significant undertaking was the discernment and consequent decision of the General Administration under Margaret’s leadership to establish new missionary ventures in Latin America .  This outreach to Latin America had been urged on by the Pope and the call was strengthened by the growing movement for the Church to take a preferential option for the poor.  Margaret called for volunteers from all provinces, and foundations were made in Brazil in 1978, Mexico in 1981 and Colombia in 1984.   These initiated an audacious experiment within our Congregation to embrace a new style of religious life with communities living amongst the poor and involved in less-institutional ministries. Grace our current Congregational leader and a member of the founding group in Brazil recalls: ‘Margaret made it clear that we were to discover a new way of being religious, not to just transplant models to a new place.  Many years later I asked Margaret if she knew what she was doing when she appointed me novice directress – me, with no experience in formation, no course as formator!  Margaret smiled and said:  I think so.  I didn’t want to send a trained formator because she would just do what she had always done.  I wanted someone who would learn how to be a formator in another land.’   Such was Margaret’s vision and daring.

At the completion of her term as Superior General Margaret showed her readiness to do herself what she had asked of her Sisters. She became a founding member of a new missionary venture in the Gambia, West Africa.  There in Farafenni, recognising the needs and possibilities, she set up a training college for local teachers as well as establishing a primary school where children were enrolled at aged 6 rather than at age 8, providing them with greater opportunities of education.  Margaret was particularly happy there.  She was able to take to heart on a personal as well as at a Congregational level, the call to be with the poor.  The sisters experienced obstacles but under her leadership they weren’t deterred and found ways to overcome them.

After three years in the Gambia, Margaret was called back to Australia to take up again with continuing generosity and commitment the role of Provincial of Australia.  In the three years of her term she initiated the move of the Blacktown community to a new house in the area so as to widen from there the apostolic involvement of the community members.  The novitiate was relocated to Bennettswood Victoria and significant extensions and renovations to the Administration house at Haberfield were begun.  It was also at this time that the Pastoral Planning process undertaken across the Congregation was set in motion here.

After completing her term as Provincial Margaret undertook pastoral and social welfare work in the inner city through St Margaret’s Hospital.  It wasn’t long though before another project took root in her heart.  I recall as Provincial of the time meeting with Margaret for coffee at the Centrepoint Shopping Centre to talk about her idea of establishing a community in a needy area.   An initial investigation with her finally led to a meeting with the Department of Housing, Liverpool who saw the value of the presence of the Sisters among the economically and socially disadvantaged in Claymore, near Campbelltown. A community was begun there in Claymore in August 1993.  From this ministry of presence other ministries developed in particular with migrants, refugees, St Vincent de Paul and the Neighbourhood Centre.  Margaret was at home with other cultures and the people warmed to her interest and respect for them.  She had a special and loved ministry with Cambodian families, teaching English and accompanying them with the challenges of life in a new country.  This initial insertion led later to similar communities being established in the Campbelltown area at Airds and at Rosemeadow.

In 2000 Margaret was missioned to Marian House, Woolwich for three years as community leader.   Her next move into the parish at Laverton Victoria in 2003 engaged her in pastoral work in particular with the socially deprived and elderly shut-ins.  After a number of years there she returned to Marian House to again give service to the Sisters there.  As time went on she increasingly needed extra care for herself as a number of health problems developed and she experienced more intense suffering. This led to her recognising and accepting her need for extra care at Southern Cross Homes at Marsfield where she moved in May 2018.  Margaret settled in well, appreciated the care and enjoyed among other things caring for her pot plants.  Her quiet warmth and friendliness there endeared her to staff and other residents.  The return of cancer this year eventually led to her final admission to the Mater Hospital a fortnight ago and to her death on 22nd July.  Despite both emotional and physical struggles, sensitively handled by medical staff and those who loved her, Margaret as usual was mindful of others.  She expressly directed that her gratitude for everything be given to the Sisters, the doctors, nurses, carers and her family.

Marist qualities aren’t difficult to find in Margaret.  From her school days and from the Sisters she knew and loved there and undoubtedly from the values lived in her family she absorbed the Marist spirit.  She had a wonderful sense of Mary in her life and a great love of the Church, of Mary’s place in it and consequently that of Marists.  The gift of self to God was unqualified and found expression in her wholehearted commitment to the Congregation and its mission.  The vision she showed, especially in her leadership, was born of this grasp she had of what it is to be Marist.  Her spirituality too was thoroughly Marist, simple and uncomplicated but quite profound.  Like Mary at Nazareth and Jeanne Marie in Jarnosse she was at home among the people, being with them, sharing life with them, loving and encouraging them in a quiet unassuming way.  There was no pretentiousness in Margaret.  She was a truly humble woman. She had a true understanding of what it was to live ‘hidden and unknown’.   Although quietly friendly by nature, a natural diffidence, even apprehension, sometimes showed in her.  This only highlighted the courage she showed throughout all her life.  So many Sisters have expressed their admiration of and gratitude for her far-sightedness and daring – for her utter goodness.

Her reserve didn’t stop her from enjoying gatherings and entertainment with the Sisters and with others.  She enjoyed the simple pleasures of craftwork, quilting, dressmaking and cooking all of which she developed some prowess in.  She appreciated music and especially liturgical music, enjoyed reading, especially spiritual books and developed an interest in Australian history.  She got to appreciate sport.   She had a special interest in young people, liked being with them, wanting and delighting in their development, their gifts and potential.

This was very evident in Margaret’s deep love for, pride, joy and interest in her family.  You, her nieces, nephews and families always gladdened her heart and she loved sharing news of you.  Her sister Pat, your Mum, was very dear to her and her death left a very big gap in her life.  Coming to terms with it was very much helped by the ongoing love, interest and devotedness shown by you.  The care you have shown to Margaret, especially in this time of her last illness, has I’m sure supported, comforted and reassured her.  Your presence here today gives evidence of the place she has in your hearts and she, together with all those with whom she has been reunited, including her sister, your Mum, surely smiles at you all with gratitude and great delight.

In giving time to ponder and recollect memories of Margaret I was drawn to the image of the valiant woman spoken about in the Book of Proverbs Ch 31.  In a reflection I came across on that passage I was alerted to the Jewish understanding of this valiant woman, in Hebrew an Eshet Chayil.   Margaret certainly warrants being named as a valiant woman.  Such a woman, we are told, possesses unique strength.  She is one in whom a person can put their trust.  Others are strengthened by her trust in them and her ability to channel their gifts for good. She gives selflessly. Her tendency to always have an outstretched hand is an exemplary quality. The valiant woman possesses wisdom and integrity. She manages situations with strength and gentleness.  Her spirituality is reflected in her actions.  She has unshakeable trust in God, who is the centre of her life, knowing that all is in God’s hands.  In short, an Eshet Chayil, a valiant woman, is a woman of inestimable value, more precious than pearls.

Margaret you were all of this and more to us.  We thank you for who you’ve been, for what you’ve given. We thank God for what God did in and through you.  We thank God for blessing us with you – a sister, friend, aunty, companion on the journey and a wonderful inspiration of self-giving love.  May you be at peace and rejoice forever in the heart of our God.

Recommitting to the Fourviere Pledge

“All to God’s greater glory and to the honour of Mary,
the Mother of our Lord, Jesus Christ.”
(Fourviere Pledge, 23rd July 1816)

Each year Marists throughout the world recall the day in July 1816 when twelve seminarians climbed the stairs in Lyons to the chapel of Our Lady of Fourviere to commit themselves to beginning a congregation in Mary’s name, a Congregation whose sole motive would be to work “for God’s greater glory” by following the example of Mary. Marists gather on this day to celebrate and recall the courage and commitment of the founding Marists who believed that just as Mary was present in the early Church she is present with us today, guiding and supporting us. This day is also an opportunity for Marists to renew their commitment to be Mary’s presence in the world today attentive to the needs of those who are in need of God’s compassionate love.

In Australia the day was marked by a celebration of the Eucharist at Hunters Hill. Marists from all branches – Laity, Sisters, Brothers, Missionary Sisters and Priests – participated in the celebration during which all prayed anew the Pledge of Fourviere.